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Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

Creative Non-Fiction does not involve any lectures, and instead has one intense 2.5 hour tutorial every week. A broad range of topics are covered, so anyone from music-reviewers to social justice writers will find a niche that they can flourish in.

A different theme or style of creative non-fiction writing is explored every week, and from this, students can choose 1-4 to base their final portfolio pieces on.

The readings themselves can be a bit hit and miss, sometimes not doing justice to the theme that is supposed to be covered for that particular week.

The final portfolio gives a lot of flexibility to thoroughly delve into topics that you love, making this subject perfect for people who love to tell real stories in their creative writing.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

It is a subject with heavy content but worth learning. Very practical knowledge regarding flow in pipes and open channels etc. Assignments include a lab report and a calculation assignment, both to be completed individually.

Recommended? No
Available as Breadth? Yes

Linguistics is great if you’re interested in knowing how language functions. However, if you think you would like to know what words actually mean, think again. This subject is all about delineating what words mean using various concepts in linguistic semantics, from formal semantics (which include quasi-mathematical formulae and are extremely off-putting for Arts students who dislike dealing with numbers and symbols) to cognitive semantics (a grand mixture of psychology and linguistics with a whole load of buzzwords such as ‘conceptual metaphor’). Assignments will ask that you explore the meaning of a single word, or distinguish between categories of verbs in terms of their semantic function, and you would think it would be as easy as looking through a dictionary. It’s not. Spoiler alert: the final essay is the ultimate nail in the coffin of your academic life; you are expected to apply one of the very complex approaches to semantics that you have learnt throughout the semester without much guidance. The fact that the lecturer is really lovely makes this subject one of the most deceptive Trojan horses around.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

MBB1 is a great introduction to Psychology. I have found the majority of this semester to be very scientific, such as behavioural neuroscience – but as long as you study consistently, you’ll be fine! You get to learn about how the brain works, including neurons and synapses, learn about learning and get to do a pretty cool assignment which involves watching a sunset. You also get to delve into ways of researching in psychology. While this subject can be quite challenging, it really is an introductory subject so just sit back, relax and enjoy yourself! It’s a multiple choice exam at the end of the semester and they give you heaps of time to do it (3 hours for 120 questions) which is great.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? No

The best-structured subject I have ever taken at this University, the heavy weighting on the practical component is fantastic for anyone who learns best from doing things hands on. The laboratories are 100 times better than first year Chemistry/Biology labs, and each student gets 3 micropipettes to use, as well as an endless supply of disposable tips and chemicals. The pracs are well laid out and the demonstrators are normally PhD/Masters students- very good to talk to! Lectures are interesting, and go through basic biochemistry lab techniques as the subject name suggests, and tutorials are useful for answering questions and getting a better feel for the subject.

It helps to have done BCMB20002 as a basis, although it is not required. Watch out though- Leo will try and snatch you up to the Biochem major with a very convincing presentation while you wait for your PCR results during one practical!

Recommended? No
Available as Breadth? Yes

A relatively dense history subject on pretty much everything you need to know about architecture up to the 1700s. Features quite a bit of stuff you need to remember with moderately-well (read: badly) structured module-based content. Plenty of extra information provided but more work than you’d expect. Look forward to the Graphical Building Analysis assignment and the 3 site visits, but beware of the extensive, dull and often irrelevant weekly readings. Get started on the major essay asap and you should be fine. This subject is a HISTORY subject more than architecture. A lot of work but pretty interesting- head lecturer Philip Goad is a beautiful man with a voice you will learn to love like a child loves their mother.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

Please do this subject! It is a fantastic in-depth look at how race is represented and constructed in the world around us.  It traces how race has been constructed historically and how it affects representations of race in our lives today.  Looking at whiteness in depth is a confronting exposition and reveals how whiteness is made invisible in Western societies like Australia. If you want to understand racism in Australia and develop some sophisticated ways in which to understand and counter these tropes, than please do this subject!

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

The lecturers and tutors are really interactive and they provide really great help for the students’ own understanding of materials even outside of the syllabus as well as feedback that motivates improvements in the following assignments.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

This subject covered topics such as neurotransmitters, sleep, memory, depression, emotion and brain imaging techniques, which were all interesting. . The first part (memory) can be a little dry but it is short. Piers Howe was the best lecturer of the four, as he managed to make the small statistics component of the subject fun and easy. It is important to memorize the authors of key studies and their findings (and how they built on other key studies) for his section. The psycho-pharmacology component is also excellent and again, each lecture focuses greatly on key studies.

The assignments (a lab report) were straightforward; however the markers were VERY picky about formatting in correct APA style (e.g. italicizing words correctly, and indentations, fonts). This subject is all about rote learning rather than concepts. The multiple choice format of the exam meant there was minimal work required, despite being 120 questions on the semester’s worth of content. The content is more science-oriented, but that can be a refreshing change for BAs.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

Ever wondered where babies came from? What happens while they spend 9 months being delivered by a stork? You learn about that in developmental psychology. It covers the behaviours and development of babies, how language and information is learned … you know, fun stuff. What wasn’t so fun was the assignment, which as 2000 words of “nothing to do with the lectures but it is kinda about development so here you go”. The exam was reasonable and if you go through the lectures, you will know your stuff. Overall, it was an interesting subject where you learn about the things that happened to you while you were younger but can only appreciate now, like learning how to talk and overcoming object permanence.