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Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? No

The best-structured subject I have ever taken at this University, the heavy weighting on the practical component is fantastic for anyone who learns best from doing things hands on. The laboratories are 100 times better than first year Chemistry/Biology labs, and each student gets 3 micropipettes to use, as well as an endless supply of disposable tips and chemicals. The pracs are well laid out and the demonstrators are normally PhD/Masters students- very good to talk to! Lectures are interesting, and go through basic biochemistry lab techniques as the subject name suggests, and tutorials are useful for answering questions and getting a better feel for the subject.

It helps to have done BCMB20002 as a basis, although it is not required. Watch out though- Leo will try and snatch you up to the Biochem major with a very convincing presentation while you wait for your PCR results during one practical!

Recommended? Yes

Available as breadth? Yes

This is a great option for medically minded students not in a Biomedicine or Science degree. The lectures covered the history and development of medical practice and principles as we know it today. They can get quite historical- great if it’s your jam, less so if not. But the tutorials were much more interesting and engaging. The assessment consists of a weekly 150 word blog (in which you had to pick out a point from the material that was covered that week and elaborate on it, say what you learnt etc. it wasn’t too hard to do), a 2000 word critical review of anything related to medicine (any text, book, movie, article, series) and a group wiki assignment relating to a ‘scandal’ in medical history. The wiki was really great and very easy to do. Overall a really good subject with a wide scope to work on your own interests whilst also picking up extra content.

Recommended? Yes

Available as breadth? Yes

A fascinating focus on genetics and their place in our multifaceted world: law, science, art, identity, appearance, genetic testing and ethics. Lectures are hit and miss, but different elements will appeal to different students. Assessment is the level you would want from a breadth subject: a group Wiki presentation, three small tests throughout and a final exam. An excellent breadth particularly for Biomedicine of Science students as it contextualises genetics in the wider world, and asks come controversial questions to mull over.

Recommended? Yes

Available as breadth? No

This subject covers the ‘basics’ of physics; similar to what is generally covered in pre- Tertiary physics. If intending to do the GAMSAT, it is recommended that you pay very close attention to this course.! This subject will be very helpful in GAMSAT prep, as well as forming the basis of your Biomedicine studies. It can be difficult but completing practice questions and getting friendly with your textbook (The Knight Textbook, College Physics) remain the more efficient way to tackle the subject.

Recommended? Yes

Available as Breadth? No

As far as Biomedicine subjects go, this is probably one of the most organised. Over the semester you look at six different ‘maladies’, from what they actually are to how they’re treated. Much like Frontiers, but you’ll be looking at everything in the context of a specific disease of syndrome, which I found made things a lot easier to learn. Back in my day you could even pick which of the six you were going to write on for the exam, which made learning the details for your chosen maladies a lot easier. Here you start to see how all the research that’s been done in your lifetime is changing the way we treat these (often surprisingly common) conditions. A word of warning though, if you’re allowed to choose which three or four of the six maladies you can write on before the final exam be cautious. If you walk into the exam and there’s a horrible prompt/topic for one of your choices, a backup is always nice to have!

Recommended? Yes

Available as Breadth? No

This is when this course’s research focus really comes to shine. You’ll have a wide range of lecturers giving an even wider range of lectures on a – you guessed it – wider still range of subjects. The name really says it all – you’ll be looking at clinical trials for drugs, upcoming research into treatments, equipment and techniques used in research, and get plenty of insights into research that hasn’t even been published yet. Everything from the really, incredibly, super specific target of drug research to public health effects is looked at. This stuff is super interesting, but in true Biomed fashion can get a bit in depth – guest lecturers love talking about their research. Like seriously, love it. There are group assignments so that’s not great, and they did this whole peer review grading thing which was weird. All your past Biomed subjects are going to be integrated into this, so try to remember as much as you can (yes, even MCB).

Recommended? Yes

Available as Breadth? No

This is a core subject for Second year of Biomedicine. 25 credit point subject, thus rightfully requires a relatively high level of study.  The topics covered were amazing and really interesting, broken into 5 main topics: Biochemistry, Genetics, Cell Biology, Immunity and Pathology. Each topic has a CAL and accompanying quiz; and at the end of semester, there are two exams. In the first week, Terry Mulhern will hit you with the 20 amino acids (structure and properties) and the 10 steps of glycolysis, 8 steps of Krebs cycle and 5 steps of the electron transport chain… start learning them early, it will really help! Given the double work load, It is really useful if you stay on top of the content and start studying early. Can be an excellent subject affording students with an insight to important and fascinating topics in human biology.

“Really interesting subject. covers the basics of human food and nutrition- has a bit of biology, a bit of chemistry and a bit of nutrition. Pretty easy to understand; topics were very interesting. Tutorials were exceedingly helpful. Nonetheless, there is a lot to remember.”

Would you recommend this subject? YES

Covers the ‘basics’ of physics; it is basically the level of physics that would have been covered in VCE physics. If you intend to do the GAMSAT, PAY VERY CLOSE ATTENTION! This subject will be very helpful. It was a bit difficult, but doing questions helped a lot. You eventually get the hang of it. The Knight textbook (College Physics) was extremely helpful and had plenty of questions.”

Would you recommend this subject? YES

“Core subject for Second year of Biomedicine. 25 credit point subject and so it rightfully requires quite a bit of work and study. The topics covered were amazing and really interesting. Subject was broken into 5 main topics: Biochemistry, Genetics, Cell Biology, Immunity and Pathology. Each topic has a CAL and accompanying quiz; and at the end of semester, there are two exams. In the first week, Terry Mulhern will hit you with the 20 amino acids (structure and properties) and the 10 steps of glycolysis, 8 steps of Krebs cycle and 5 steps of the electron transport chain… start learning them early, it will really help!
I advise that you start studying EARLY, don’t miss any lectures, don’t fall behind. Its an awesome subject; it gave a taste of many important and awesome topics in human biology; I really really really loved it, but requires lots of work. Enjoy it!”

Would you recommend this subject? YES