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Recommended? No
Available as Breadth? Yes

A relatively dense history subject on pretty much everything you need to know about architecture up to the 1700s. Features quite a bit of stuff you need to remember with moderately-well (read: badly) structured module-based content. Plenty of extra information provided but more work than you’d expect. Look forward to the Graphical Building Analysis assignment and the 3 site visits, but beware of the extensive, dull and often irrelevant weekly readings. Get started on the major essay asap and you should be fine. This subject is a HISTORY subject more than architecture. A lot of work but pretty interesting- head lecturer Philip Goad is a beautiful man with a voice you will learn to love like a child loves their mother.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

What a fantastic subject! Not only do you get the chance to travel to Far North Queensland to look at some key sights, swim in water holes and take part in proper coring activities, but you also make 25 great friends.

The subject consists of the 10 day field trip in the Mid-Sem break, and doesn’t require much work. You can go and take no notes if you so please, but Ian Thomas is an extremely interesting individual who knows his stuff, so it’s a good opportunity to learn new concepts and ideas. The theory of it isn’t overly in-depth, a lot of it is broad. You get maybe 10-60 minutes of “lecture” a day, depending on the activities.

When you come back, during the semester there is a laboratory project examining pollen slides taken from a sediment core, and presenting a research paper as a poster. The workload is fine, with 2 hours a week you couldn’t ask for much more!

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

This is the capstone subject for the Environmental Geographies major in BEnvs, but taken by a wide range of disciplines. Brian Cook’s ecstatic manner of teaching is the forefront and most enjoyable part of this subject. Lectures are the most engaging part of the subject and tend to work better when Brian goes off-bat, so just ask some questions to get the ball rolling. A mixed class of many cultures as well as economists and socialists joined together to discuss the so called oxymoron of “Sustainable Development”. Brian is consistently skeptical about it, and pushes you and your moral judgement. The bullet-point essay ends up being easier than you think, and if you want a good mark in your Tutorial Presentation make sure to have a good activity. The take home exam topic was fair, but challenging. If all of university was like this subject, it would be hella rad.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? Yes

If all subjects at university were like this one, it would be a much more enjoyable experience. The subject has basic lectures with additional support materials, simple practicals with tough marking, as well as an awesome field camp, at which you conduct a group-based (don’t groan) research project, and you come out of it writing a proper report as you would present any scientific journal. The staff are committed and it’s a very interesting subject.

Recommended? Yes
Available as Breadth? No

A fantastic subject involving a field trip to New Zealand for 10 days in February. There are pre-field trip lectures which set the scene for the subject and a (straightforward) assignment to kick you off. Then you drive around NZ looking at awesome landscapes and studying the formations within them, relating to the past glacial history. We paid separately for a helicopter flight and landed on the Fox Glacier, which was amazing. Post-field trip, were interesting guest lecturers, and a Field Report, which was difficult to grasp the understanding of but a good exercise. Two computer based practicals help with data analysis. Russell Drysdale is a boss- super guy who runs the subject.

Recommended? Yes

Available as Breadth? Yes

An easy and engaging subject for anyone interested in the natural environment. It features a 5 day field trip to Tasmania at the beginning of the mid semester break, semester 2. For $500 you get to visit Cradle Mountain, Cataract Gorge and Ben Lomond. Ian ‘Wombat’ Thomas is the most ill-organised academic to exist, but an encyclopaedia of plant species and features. Phil Mountain-Goat Marren has a knack for making everyone feel intellectually inferior but has great chats about Iceland and glaciers, if that’s your jam. If you’re more about warmer climates, consider the Summer intensives GEOL20001 Geology of Southeast Australia to Southeast Victoria, ENST20002 Environmental Field Change Class to Far North Queensland for 10 days or GEOG30023 Global Climate Change in Context for a 10 day field trip to New Zealand.

Landscape and Diversity’s assessments are easily organised- a few prac reports (completed in class), a field journal and an exam that accurately mirrors the lecture schedule.

Recommended? Yes

Available as breadth? Yes

This course is an introduction to all things to do with maps: history of maps, different kinds of maps, how to make maps and take measurements, how to interpret maps, what makes a good map, modern mapping technologies, and much more. It serves as a stepping stone to many more physical environmental majors but is also a useful and holistic subject. The lecturer, Cliff Ogleby, is absolutely brilliant. He is the stand-out lecturer from first year. He’s really passionate, enthusiastic, and soft-hearted.

Kenny Tan, the senior tutor, runs most of the prac classes. He is a lovable character, quite keen and pretty funny.

In the pracs you have to form groups of four people to work with for the entire semester – all assessment is group-based (except the online test at the end of semester). Basically, in the prac classes, you just work on your group assignments – one week you gather data for the project, the next week you write up the report. You don’t necessarily have to do homework for this subject, but if you want top marks, you should be prepared to pitch in outside class time and write detailed chunks of Discussions etc. for the reports. There is also no exam but there

Recommended? Yes

Available as breadth? Yes

I found this to be a really excellent subject, well taught by Davo. It was really interesting to have a different view on the environment, rather than the same view that is seen over and over again in the other first year environments subjects. The only slightly annoying thing was the 9am lecture on Tuesday but they will probably try to change that to a better time next semester. I also really enjoyed the tutes with Joe, as he was really engaging, and despite them not being compulsory I found myself going to each one because they expanded on the topics that we covered in the lectures, and if I missed a lecture it didn’t matter greatly because it would be explained in the tutorial. A downside to the subject is that the lectures aren’t recorded, however the lecture slides are very helpful as are the tutorials, and Davo generally releases topic notes before the tests which can also help to clarify any unfamiliar concepts.

Recommended? Yes

Available as Breadth? Yes

“The best environmental course content with the worst teaching staff imaginable.” Under previous leadership, this subject was the highest scored subject in SES surveys. The content remains but is now taught by Rebecca Ford who seems unsure whether or not she should blink, let alone assert validity of her statements. That being said, the subject gives a grounded understanding of how humans use the environment, why we like particular things and how to harness psychology to protect the environment, use responsibly or plan effectively. This subject would be invaluable for any environments student looking to get anything out of their degree.

Urban Design and Planning involves looking at how we build and live in cities. Strong emphasis is placed on sustainability and the importance of social, environmental and economic factors being considered in tandem.

The major borrows from architecture designs subjects (studios) and more sociology-based subjects. Compulsory subjects are listed in the handbook. As with all Environments majors, subject choice is quite prescriptive. Course costs are high, with costs upwards for hundreds of dollars for studies including materials, tools and printing. Additionally, Adobe Design Suite or CAD may be useful investments if you want to be able to do work at home for some subjects.