What is OCD?

People with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder experience persistent intrusive thoughts compelling them into specific behavioral patterns. The most commonly known form of this is obsessive cleanliness, but OCD can take any form of disruptive thoughts and behaviors. Lack of understanding and awareness about OCD, especially for those who are diagnosed, can cause personal conflicts because people without OCD often don’t understand their co-worker/friend/family member’s inability to concentrate or disruption of events in order to act out specific behaviors. Because of the myths surrounding OCD, it can be very hard for people to understand what is happening to them, or to seek help.

To understand OCD, it’s important to understand that the condition is in many ways an extreme form of anxiety, one which manifests in obsessive behaviors that help calm the brain down. Ignoring their compulsion can cause people with OCD extreme discomfort and distress, because the compulsive thoughts/feelings will often continue and possibly escalate until the action is completed.

Do I have OCD?

If you experience obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours, it is a good idea to talk to a therapist or doctor about your symptoms. You can read about the symptoms here and here to get a general idea and fill out the Beyond Blue OCD checklist. Remember, if you are experiencing any distressing or disruptive thoughts and feelings, it is always worth bringing up with a health professional.

Resources

Living with OCD:

https://www.sane.org/the-sane-blog/mental-illness/what-i-wish-people-knew-about-ocd

https://www.sane.org/the-sane-blog/my-story/living-with-obsessive-compulsive-disorder

https://www.sane.org/people-like-us/309-julie

Anxiety support group:

Students with OCD are welcome in the Anxiety support group run every Tuesday at 4:15pm, Training Room 1 Union House. It is a confidential space to talk with other students, including trained facilitators.

 

Mental wellness support group:

Mental wellness support group runs on alternative Tuesdays with anxiety support group, in the same time and space. It’s a confidential space to talk about neurodivergent and navigating study, work and relationships.

SEDS & Advocacy:

If you have OCD, it is a good idea to apply for ongoing special consideration early on, in case you need it.

If you are having trouble applying and are unable to contact SEDS, or if you need support clearing up issues with the university that have already happened, Advocacy offer support in advocating for yourself, as well as understanding the legal and administrative processes involved.

You can also contact us, or come in during our office hours, with any questions you may have about SEDS and any coursework issues you might have. We are open 11am-6pm Mon-Thurs, on level one Union House (across from stop one and near the stairs).

Anxiety support group:

Anxiety support group is run every second Tuesday at 4:15pm, Training Room 1 Union House. It is a quiet, safe space to talk about anxiety issues confidentially.

Mental wellness support group:

Mental wellness support group runs on alternative Tuesdays with anxiety support group, in the same time and space. It’s a confidential space to talk about neurodivergent and navigating study, work and relationships.

Online Resources:

https://www.sane.org/get-help

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